Friday Night Fragments #36

Tonight’s edition of the fragments is best enjoyed on drugs. Yes, drugs. Really!

Kidding, but not really, but still totally kidding. Maybe.

Artist Bryan Saunders is not only cursed with a name that sounds a hell of a lot like “Bernie Sanders”, but also with a strange desire to check out exactly what happens when he draws a bunch of self-portraits while on drugs. Unsurprisingly, he suffered a certain level of brain damage following the experiment.

Still, the portraits are worth checking out. Very interesting stuff.

Are computers racist? Don’t be stupid. Everything is racist.

Pattern recognition algorithms picking up on patterns in the bone structure of primate skulls? Ridiculous.

Flippant insinuations aside, it’s hard not to see a resemblance to various animals when looking at the faces of certain individuals. Look too closely, and you might see not just gorillas, but also owls and snakes and all other manner of creature. I’ve seen cats and camels and birds and I know a girl with a countenance so similar to a basset hound it’s almost eerie.

Decide for yourself what you want the implications to be.

The infamous Soapjackal wonders what it is about alcohol, feminists, and agency. It’s a good question. Here’s my crack at it.

Alcohol acts to depress our inhibitions. This results in patterns of behavior that are closer in line with how we act without the acts of calculation and conscious override. While drunk, we act in a more “authentic” fashion than usual, which gives us a glimpse into our true selves.

(Side note: If you want to keep some track of how your unconscious behavioral patterns change over time, you should periodically get black-out drunk and have a trusted accomplice record your actions and dialogue.)

If someone is lacking in agency — as understood by a certain capacity of intelligence and executive functions to exercise veto power over instincts and emotional drives — then drinking will not only further dampen their ability to control themselves, but it might also reveal to them their overall inability to exercise free will as a matter of general principle.

In other words, people who claim that alcohol strips agency from them are utilizing rationalization as a defense mechanism to protect their ego from having to admit that they aren’t capable of acting in a manner that they consciously choose. This is not to say that alcohol doesn’t make you less capable of acting with agency, but to point out that it’s a lot easier to blame an external agent like alcohol than it is to admits one’s own internal flaws.

Short version: Projection. Everything is projection. It’s projection all the way down.

Respect is a funny thing. It’s easy to disrespect people if they possess bad traits, and yet bad traits mean nothing to us if we respect them. Yet, we respect people for their traits. Or do we?

This is the will of the noble soul: they desire nothing gratis, least of all life.

He who is of the mob wants to live gratis; we others, however, to whom life has given itself — we are always considering what we can give best in return!

And truly, it is a noble speech that says: “What life has promised us, we shall keep that promise — to life!”

One should not wish to enjoy where one has not given enjoyment. And — one should not wish to enjoy!

For enjoyment and innocence are the modest things: neither want to be looked for. One should have them — but one should look rather for guilt and pain!

Of Old and New Law-Tables: §6, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche

People are generally happier when surrounded by people of their genetic heritage. This correlation is weaker as intelligence goes up. Is this because people who are smarter are more likely to lie about their affinities when taking a survey, or is there actually something going on here?

I lean towards the latter. While I couldn’t dig up the relevant post, I’m fairly certain that I’ve written before about how the more elite someone is, the more they consider “elite” to be their ethnicity and prefer to associate with other elite individuals, with such association being their preferred brand of “ethno-nationalism”, as it were.

I definitely didn’t put it like that before, but certainly am now.

It’s been a while since this blog has made mention of aesthetics.

crouching tiger

Who knows what could have happened had I let that continue?

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5 thoughts on “Friday Night Fragments #36

  1. Aeoli Pera 07/11/2015 / 10:40 PM

    You have absolutely fantastic taste in aesthetics.

  2. Aeoli Pera 07/11/2015 / 10:56 PM

    >Still, the portraits are worth checking out. Very interesting stuff.

    I don’t know much about drugs, but now I know which ones are definitely 100% bad for you. Funny how those all end up being a couple of half-hearted scribbles like an infant might make, almost by accident.

    >Decide for yourself what you want the implications to be.

    I am wrongspecies. It is not okay to mock us. Our struggle is your struggle. 10% of people are born the wrong animal.

    Ditto everything you said about alcohol. I remember reading once that the way people act under the influence is a social construct because people in different countries act different when they’re drunk. Sure they do, because they’re fundamentally different sorts of people! What a crock of shit.

    >Respect is a funny thing. It’s easy to disrespect people if they possess bad traits, and yet bad traits mean nothing to us if we respect them. Yet, we respect people for their traits. Or do we?

    See, this is another thing where I beg to differ, possibly because WrongPlanet. I respect lots of people with bad traits, and I don’t feel like I need to ignore their bad traits. Vox Day for instance.

    >People are generally happier when surrounded by people of their genetic heritage. This correlation is weaker as intelligence goes up. Is this because people who are smarter are more likely to lie about their affinities when taking a survey, or is there actually something going on here?

    Well, hang on, there are certain theories floating around the internet that say smart people might be as related to each other as to their kin. They have a tendency to look alike, after all.

    All we can say with 100% certainty is that all correlations get weird when you pass the 130 mark.

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